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Perennial Planting Guide and Common Gardening Terms-

The following is a list of general (and I use that term loosely) planting instructions and care for most of the perennials, biennials, bulbs, and rhizomes that I sell. Common gardening terms are explained in the first section, followed by the plant's common name and care. All of these plants are hardy in my zone 5 garden. Check auction details for exact zone information on specific cultivar of these plants. These have been tried and true techniques for me. You may need to alter them a bit if you are in a much colder or warmer climate than mine. I cannot help you with clay soil, as I moved away from that disaster and never looked back!

TERMS

Amend Soil- add organic matter such as peat, compost, manure (sometimes to make acidic/alkaline)

Full Shade- north to east side of house (or tree, fence, big statue, etc.)

Full Sun- south to west side of house (the sun sets in the west- believe me, people ask!)

Mulch Soil- add covering to surface of soil such as wood chips for moisture retention and weed control

Part Shade- glass half empty? (should be early morning sun- east side)

Part Sun- glass half full? (try planting everywhere to see what works)

Rich Soil- highly amended and rich in nutrients

Well Drained Soil- light, sandy, no standing water, possible hill or incline, some rock gardens

Winter Mulch- add covering to plant only after ground has frozen (not just 1st frost)

CARE

Bee Balm/Monarda- full to part sun, moist, rich soil, plant roots just below soil level

Bearded Iris- full sun, well drained soil, plant shallow in soil with rhizome exposed

Beardtongue/Penstemon- full to part sun, well drained soil, plant roots just below soil level

Bethlehem Sage/Pulmonaria- full to part shade, moist, rich soil, plant roots just below soil, pull dry leaves

Blackberry Lily/Belamcanda- (see Bearded Iris) stake taller plants

Butterfly Weed/Asclepias t- (see Beardtongue)

Cardinal Flower/Lobelia- full to part sun, moist, rich soil, plant roots just below soil, stake taller plants

Columbine/Aquilegia- (see Beardtongue) cut back dry foliage

Daylily/Hemerocallis- full sun to full shade, moist, rich soil, plant roots just below soil level

Dragon Flower/Physostegia- (see Beardtongue)

Flag Iris/Pseudacorus- full sun, moist rich soil, plant shallow in soil with rhizome exposed

Hens and Chicks/Sempervivum- full sun, well drained soil, plant roots at soil level

Honeysuckle Vine/Lonicera- full to part sun, moist, rich soil, plant roots just below soil level, use trellis

Hosta- full to part shade, moist, rich soil, plant roots just below soil level

Lily/Lilium- full to part sun, rich soil, well drained soil, plant 6" below soil, leave live foliage attached

Lily of the Valley/Convallaria- (see Hosta)

Lilyturf/Liriope- (see Beardtongue)

Loosestrife/Lysimachia- full to part sun, moist, plant roots just below soil level

Lupine/Lupinus- full to part sun, rich soil, well drained soil, plant roots just below soil level

Meadow Sage/Salvia- (see Hens and Chicks)

Mint/Mentha- (see Bee Balm)

Prickly Pear Cactus/Optuntia- full sun, well drained soil, push roots or freshly cut plant upright into soil

Ribbon Grass/Phalaris- (see Bee Balm)

Shasta Daisy/Leucanthemum- full to part sun, plant roots just below soil level

Siberian Iris- (see Bee Balm)

Snow on the Mountain/Aegopodium- full to part shade, plant roots just below soil level, cut dry leaves

Spurge/Euphorbia- (see Shasta Daisy)

Stonecrop/Sedum- full to part sun, well drained soil, plant just below soil level

Swamp Milkweed/Asclepias i- (see Loosestrife)

Trumpet Creeper Vine/Campsis- full sun, plant roots just below soil level

Water Celery/Oenanthe- (see Bee Balm)

All newly planted perennials should be watered well until established. Mulch soil, but keep away from roots and foliage. Take note that this is just a general guide to plant care. Mother Nature, as well as plants can be rather unpredictable across the country. A perennial that loves sun in my zone 5 garden may thrive better in the shade of your zone 10 garden. Roots may also need to be planted deeper in southern gardens than in the north. We typically have to winter mulch our perennials in the north when some southerners have never heard of this. Practice different gardening techniques to find which works best for you and your plants. Last, but not least, foliage up, roots down. (Yes, people ask!) When in doubt, plant sideways. Most of these perennials are so hardy that they will fight to grow in the correct direction. The "strong shall survive" in my garden. You will appreciate my motto!

 

 



 

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